Race To Robie Creek MK Team

MK Foundation April Anniversaries

April was a month of milestone anniversaries for organizations in our community some of those celebrations were historically significant for Morrison Knudsen and the Foundation as well. Just to name a few: the Depot turned 90, the MK Nature Center turned 25, and the Foundation was again able to sponsor the Rocky Canyon Sailtoads Race to Robie Creek–this year was their 38th annual race!


38th Annual Rocky Canyon Sailtoads Race to Robie Creek

Race to Robie Creek MK Team

Recognize anyone in this Race to Robie Creek photo?

The Race to Robie Creek has earned a reputation of being the toughest half marathon to complete–quite often found on the bucket lists of marathon enthusiasts.  Participation is limited to 2,437 racers and it fills up within a few hours of the on-line registration opening around February 16th.  Race day this year was April 18th.  The MK Foundation was proud to be a sponsor of this year’s 38th Annual Race to Robie Creek.  In fact, MK sponsored the Race to Robie Creek almost from their beginning.  Throughout the years EmKayans trained together and looked forward to participating as a team.  A huge thank you should go out to Terry Hazen, now an MK retiree, who volunteered to organize the team entry and race communications for many years. The Sailtoads are made up of a 32 member committee of racing marathon aficionados and they utilize over 800 volunteers. The Sailtoads donate all the proceeds of their annual race to local charitable organizations.  Last year they donated over $81,000 to 45 organizations.  Their goal is to put on the best event possible and they never disappoint us!  MK Foundation team, we’d love to post your race photos and comments. Visit the Race to Robie Creek’s webpage here: http://robiecreek.com/.


MK Nature Center turned 25!

The Morrison Knudsen Foundation recognizes the important role of the MK Nature Center to our community, and we continue to support projects to enhance and maintain its beauty. The Nature Center's stream walk and education building provide visitors opportunity to enjoy beautiful Boise River landscapes and abundant wildlife. The underwater viewing windows along the stream walk give visitors a view of native aquatic plants, fish and wildlife that depend on the River for their existence.  Many species of fish can be viewed as they swim in their natural stream habitat past the viewing windows that are easily accessible along the walking paths and foot bridges.  The Foundation recently funded a roof project and has plans to partner with BSU Construction Management students on bridge and other projects for the Center.As Morrison-Knudsen’s Centennial Gift to Idaho, the Morrison Knudsen Nature Center opened in 1990. The Center is now managed and operated by the Idaho Fish and Wildlife Foundation.  Morrison Knudsen Foundation is proud to have been part of such an impressive private and public collaborative effort and we continue to support projects to enhance and maintain its beauty. The Foundation recently funded a roof project and has plans to partner with BSU Construction Management students on bridge and other projects for the Center.  In close proximity to the main headquarters for Morrison Knudsen, the Nature Center’s stream walk often provided EmKayans a convenient opportunity to enjoy beautiful Boise River landscapes and abundant wildlife. The underwater viewing windows along the stream walk give visitors a view of native aquatic plants, fish and wildlife that depend on the River for their existence. Many species of fish can be viewed as they swim in their natural stream habitat past the viewing windows that are easily accessible along the walking paths and foot bridges. Visit the MK Nature Center’s webpage here: http://fishandgame.idaho.gov/public/education/?getPage=234.


The Boise Depot turned 90

In 1990 Morrison Knudsen purchased the Boise depot that had closed its doors in 1981 and renovated it to pristine condition. The Foundation was headquartered at the depot for several years. The original Barkalow Brothers newsstand which had been built when the station opened in 1925 was discovered behind a false wall and was in such good condition that it required little restoration. Other historical exhibits related to the history of rail travel in Idaho and history of the depot graced the walls and alcoves. The Foundation operated the museum and offered it to the public for special events and tours until 1996 when the City of Boise took it over. Thousands turned out in April 1925 for the grand opening as Boise’s first transcontinental train, The Portland Rose, rolled into town. The restoration ensured that the depot will continue to marvel the public as a prominent monument of great historical significance for our community.In 1990 Morrison Knudsen purchased the Boise depot that was facing an unsure future since closing its doors in 1981. After two years of painstaking work and a couple million dollars, the depot was renovated to pristine condition.  All the contractors and sub-contractors were Idaho-based. The Foundation was headquartered at the depot operating the museum and offering it for special events and tours, from the ribbon cutting in 1993 until 1996 when the City of Boise took it over.  This restoration ensured that the 1925 depot will continue to marvel the public as a prominent monument of great historical significance for our community.  From the hand-painted beams to the bells for the tower clock, great care was taken to insure that the restoration project was executed with complete historical accuracy.  Happy 90th Birthday to a grand historical landmark for our Boise community–we can honestly say that it looks almost as good as the day it was born! Visit the Boise Depot’s webpage here: https://parks.cityofboise.org/parks-locations/parks/boise-depot/.